Chicken Lenses




The information below is from, Back To The Futures in a chapter entitled, Chicken Lenses. It is the chapter immediately after, Pampered Pigs Producer Perfect Porkers that I posted yesterday, here on Inside Futures.

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Chicken Lenses


Last week, a friend dropped a magazine article on my desk for me to read. It was from the May 30, 1989 issue of Womans Day.

Normally, I dont read Womans Day. And not because it happens to be a magazine aimed at women! I dont read Womans Day because, generally speaking, it does not concern itself with the markets or the economy.

But this particular issue contained a small article that I found so interesting and thought-provoking that I decided to reprint in Commodity Insight . Though the article is not market related, it does shed some light on the lengths that some in agriculture will go in order to increase the efficiency and profitability of their operations.

Judge for yourself whether or not this article is thought provoking and enlightening.

A Massachusetts businessman wants the countrys chickens to see red through red contact lenses. According to Animalens, based in Wellesley, university studies from around the globe prove the color red has a pacifying effect on hens. As a result, they lay more eggs, eat less, and are less likely to attack one another. The lenses, which stay in place for about a year (the lifespan of a chicken) and cost fifteen cents a pair, have been tested on tens of thousands of chickens. To date, none of the feather test subjects has put up a squawk.

There is no doubt that this article is thought-provoking. The very idea of chickens wearing contact lenses raises more questions than I can count. The most logical, of course, is: how on earth do you fit a chicken for contact lenses?

And what happens if a hen, for whatever reason, rejects the lenses? Can she be refitted with red-tinted eyeglasses? Because chickens dont have ears, how on earth can eyeglasses remain in place without sliding toward the very tip of their stubby little beaks?

According to the article, the contact lenses have been tested on tens of thousands of chickens all over the globe. I wonder if the chickens were fitted by people with tiny index fingers? I also have questions about the cost of the lenses. Chicken lenses, at fifteen cents a pair, total ninety cents a dozen. My goodness, a dozen red-colored chicken lenses are going to cost as much as a dozen eggs!

And just wait until cattle and hog producers decide to fit their animals with red-colored contact lenses. It wont be a pretty sight. Ive seen red-eyed pigs, and believe me, theyre ugly as sin.

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The opening call for grains tonight is lower. There were more cases of coronavirus announced over the weekend with an increase in fatalities as well. The Big Four: stocks, bonds, currencies and commodities are subject to news headlines about coronavirus and global economies suffering as a result. Moving forward, the only market or markets I favor on the long side of the ledger are cattle for here and now and hogs at some point sooner than later.


The time is 8:38 a.m. Sunday, March 29, Chicago time






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